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Thursday, Apr. 24, 2014

AccuWeather calling for typical winter with a little more snow, perhaps

Thursday, November 17, 2005

Another winter forecast has been made.

The folks at AccuWeather, State College, Pa., a national forecasting company are saying we can look for a typical winter as far as precipitation and temperatures go.

The company issued its 30- and 90-day forecasts Wednesday.

"A dip in the upper-level steering currents will develop over the Mississippi Valley during much of December, generating an active winter storm track from the southern Plains to New England," the 30-day forecast states. "Along this track, precipitation will be near to above normal."

Clay County is on the edge of that area said AccuWeather Meteorologist John Ferrick in a telephone interview with The Brazil Times on Wednesday.

Additionally, "The region from the central and northern Plains to New England will be colder than normal during December. Much of the precipitation that falls in this region will be in the form of snow or ice."

West Central Indiana is south of a line connecting the Central Plains to New England, so it remains to be seen if our snowfall will be near normal or above normal. One thing Accu-Weather doesn't forecast for us is a mild winter!

"We are generally looking for normal or slightly above normal snowfall for the eastern half of the country (including Indiana)," Ferrick said.

For the 90-day outlook, AccuWeather also predicts colder than normal temperatures across the eastern third of the nation, December-February, with the exception of Florida, which will be near normal.

Sidebar: National 30-Day Outlook

-A dip in the upper-level steering currents will develop over the Mississippi Valley during much of December, generating an active winter storm track from the southern Plains to New England. Along this track, precipitation will be near to above normal.

-South Florida and California will have above-normal temperatures during December.

-The Southeast and the Middle Atlantic regions will experience near-normal temperatures, as will a broad region of the U.S. that stretches from the Pacific Northwest southeast to Texas.

-The region from the central and northern Plains to New England will be colder than normal during December. Much of the precipitation that falls in this region will be in the form of snow or ice.

-Higher levels of precipitation over relatively warm waters will create more lake-effect snow than usual in the Great Lakes region.

-The Pacific Northwest should have near-normal precipitation in December, but the remainder of the western states, as well as the Rockies and the western Plains, will likely have below-normal precipitation.

National 90-Day Outlook

-December through February will be colder than normal over the eastern third of the nation. The only exception will be south Florida, which will experience near-normal temperatures.

-Much of the western half of the nation will be warmer than normal during the next 90 days, but Utah, southern Idaho and Nevada will experience near-normal temperatures.

-Precipitation will be above normal from the eastern Great Lakes to northern New England, and near normal from southern New England and the Middle Atlantic region to the central Gulf Coast.

-The Southeast coast will be drier than normal in the 90-day period, as will much of the western United States. Only the region from the Pacific Northwest to western Montana will have near-normal precipitation.

-This winter will likely be quite snowy from the Great Lakes to New England, where temperatures will be below normal and precipitation near to above normal.

-A developing drought in the southern Plains is likely to worsen this winter.



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