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Thursday, May 5, 2016

Soldier coming back home in a few months

Friday, January 11, 2008

(Photo)
David Moody
Army Pfc. David Moody takes life day-to-day.

"I'm doing OK," Moody said via e-mail from Iraq.

Moody has been in Iraq as part of the 101st Airborne Unit for 13 months. He e-mailed The Brazil Times Wednesday wanting to inform the public he will be coming home soon.

"I'm coming home in a few months," Moody said. "I just wanted to tell you so you can tell everyone I said hello and I'm coming home."

Moody said life in Iraq has gotten better steady. However, there are still hot spots.

"Iraq is still dangerous, but it's getting better," Moody said.

He said in 2005, Iraq was in bad shape while he was on his first tour.

"It's getting better over here," Moody said, "Less roadside bombs, less gun fire"

Moody said there are more explosive formed projectiles (EFP's) that soldiers have to deal with, particularly on roads.

"I work every day," Moody said. "We don't really get a day off. They keep us busy every day."

Moody spends most of his days driving semi-trucks that are called 915's. He said they are 45-feet long.

Currently, Moody is housed at Camp Taij. He is part of the 494 Transport Company, based out of the 101st Airborne Unit.

The former Northview High School football player said various media reports about Iraq still being a dangerous place are correct.

"The media is a little right," he said. "It's time for us to come home. Our lives are in danger. It's crazy."

Moody added he did see some soldiers from a unit based in Brazil and worked with some of them for nearly six months.

"It was like being at home," he said. "They rode on convoys with us."

Moody said he hopes to work in the postal service or for UPS when he returns.

"I miss Brazil like crazy," he said.

Moody has already served one tour in Iraq, where he operated a 50-caliber machine gun mounted on the lead truck of a supply convoy.



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