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Monday, May 2, 2016

Local woman avoids scam

Tuesday, July 19, 2011

Almost immediately, Sue Piper knew something was wrong.

Sue, who lives in Brazil, had advertised a couple of puppies she wanted to sell in The Brazil Times as well as on craigslist, an online classified website.

She received a phone call from someone interested in purchasing one of the puppies, who had witnessed her advertisement on craigslist. She then gave out her e-mail and the two parties began corresponding back and forth.

Sue was told she would receive a money order for the puppy through Federal Express.

After a few days, she received the money order.

While she was selling the puppies for $250, the money order was for more than $1,700.

Sue said the person contacted her and informed her they had "slightly" overpaid. They asked her to cash the check, take the money out and send the money back.

"I was like, 'This is not right.' There were red flags going on all over the place," Sue told The Times.

Sue immediately went to her bank and told the teller she believed something was wrong with the check.

The teller promptly told there was. The check was fraudulent.

"The bank knows," Clay County Sheriff Mike Heaton said. "They've dealt with it so many times. They can tell you right there. It doesn't take long for them to figure it out."

But Sue's ordeal wasn't finished.

She received a call from the person who had sent her the money order wanting the balance. However, Sue told them she knew the money order was fraudulent and had informed authorities.

"I was running an ad for dogs and they tried to take me," she said. "When I got the check, I knew instantly that they were trying to sucker me."

Sue later received another e-mail from the person, but did not respond.

Heaton said his department receives hundreds of calls from residents regarding scams of this sort annually.

Recently, he said the department has received 15-20.

"It's sort of like the Western Union scams," Heaton said. "It's just another way these individuals prey on people. It was good that she took notice and didn't get stuck."

Heaton said typically, checks or money orders have security features on them that banks notice immediately. However, scam artists will purchase check paper in an attempt to make the checks or money orders look as real as possible.

"Any more, it's just non-stop," Heaton said of scams like this going on.

While Sue wasn't scammed in this instance, she now has second thoughts regarding shopping online.

"I'd hate for anybody to get suckered," she said. "It's just wrong."


Comments
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Some people just think that it is a crime to actually have to WORK to EARN money. Good job Sue.

-- Posted by Conservative Dad on Wed, Jul 20, 2011, at 6:28 AM

I would have told the person on the phone (when they called asking for the balance) that I'd cashed the MO and spent the money and thanks for the extra cash! Just to mess with them.

Good job, indeed! Who in the world would pay "a little extra" above the listed price of anything? Seriously.

-- Posted by Emmes on Wed, Jul 20, 2011, at 10:54 AM

You say in your article, that the woman received a "money order", then you say she received a "check". So which was it, a money order or a check?? They are NOT the same.

QUOTE: "Sue immediately went to her bank and told the teller she believed something was wrong with the check"

QUOTE: "Sue told them she knew the money order was fraudulent"

-- Posted by BWare on Wed, Jul 20, 2011, at 6:27 PM

Does it make a difference? Other than to give someone a reason to find something petty to cry about.

-- Posted by olmedic on Thu, Jul 21, 2011, at 8:36 AM

Crying, is there something wrong with you? And yes, it does make a difference, ask a defense attorney. And for the purpose of an accurate story, yes it makes a difference. Probably didn't make a difference to you, an olmedic, if it was a broken arm or a broken leg, huh?

-- Posted by BWare on Thu, Jul 21, 2011, at 10:12 AM

Remind me not to hire your defense attorney. I would rather mine not base his defense theory on a newspaper article.

As for the broken leg and broken arm question. No, it doesn't make a difference.

-- Posted by olmedic on Thu, Jul 21, 2011, at 10:32 AM

OOhh .. they did it HERE too, BWARE!

"After a few days, she received the money order.

Sue said the person contacted her and informed her they had "slightly" overpaid. They asked her to cash the check, take the money out and send the money back."

-- Posted by Emmes on Thu, Jul 21, 2011, at 11:46 AM

Careful Emmes, olmedic, our resident legal expert, says it doesn't make a difference. He/she will say you are crying. Duh!

-- Posted by BWare on Thu, Jul 21, 2011, at 4:56 PM

Intially the person said it was a MO but when it came by Fedex it was a check. No matter if there is inconsistencies in the article the point to be taken from it is to becareful when dealing with people on the internet.

-- Posted by pipers4 on Sat, Jul 23, 2011, at 6:46 AM


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